Tag Archives: knee

The Three Stooges Get Workers’ Comp: Why Backs Trump Knees and Shoulders in Wisconsin

Wisconsin’s unique workers’ compensation system contains one significant distinction, between “limb” injuries and “spine” injuries. Limb injuries (shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips, knees) are not worth as much to the injured worker as a spine injury.

To illustrate this problem to my law students, I use the 3 Stooges example: Moe, Larry and Curly work for a tree service earning $15 per hour or $600 per week. A tree branch falls on all three of them, injuring Moe’s shoulder, Larry’s knee, and Curly’s neck. They are all off work for 10 weeks while they are healing from surgeries required by the injury. During that time they received Temporary Total Disability at two-thirds of their wage or $400 per week, a total of $4,000 for each of them. After they are done healing, all three of their doctors assign a 10% functional disability rating for their injury and a 10- pound lifting restriction, which their employer cannot accommodate.

Moe gets 10% of 500 weeks for his shoulder payable at $362 per week, or a whopping total of $18,100 – making his total workers’ comp recovery just over $20,000.

Larry gets 10% of a knee or 42.5 weeks at $362 per week, or $15,385 – making his total recovery just under $20,000.

Curly, who had a neck injury and surgery, gets 10% of 1000 weeks at $362 per week, or $36,200. However, since he cannot return to the tree company, he also gets a recovery for his Loss of Earning Capacity. Based on his 10- pound restriction and his very limited education, he is probably limited to a minimum wage or part time job which would result in a 50% Loss of Earning Capacity, payable for 500 weeks or a total of $181,000. If his disability is serious enough, he may in fact receive his $400 per week for the rest of his life, bringing his total to well over a half million dollars.

That’s why many workers’ compensation attorneys (and insurance companies) focus their attention on spine injuries.