Category Archives: Workers’ Compensation

Who Is Your Doctor?: Choice of Doctor Under Worker’s Compensation

A common dilemma faced by many injured workers: where to seek treatment following a work injury. Some employers force injured workers to a designated medical provider and many times the injured worker continues treatment with that provider. Workers often assume they cannot switch or see their own physician (which is not correct). Treatment at the employer-designated provider continues until the injured worker is sent back to work, even if the injured worker has not fully healed, which can lead to further injury or employment consequences.

Workers can receive treatment from their own doctor following a work injury.  An injured worker in Wisconsin has a right to two “choices” of treating practitioners. What constitutes a “choice” is defined in Wisconsin Statute §102.41(2)(a) and includes any physician, chiropractor, psychologist, dentist, physician assistant, advanced practice nurse practitioner, or podiatrist. The important aspect of physician choice is that referrals from one doctor to another do not exhaust a choice.    

We frequently receive calls from injured workers who believe that a referral from their primary care doctor to an orthopedic doctor is the second choice. But that is not how the law works.  Only if the injured worker leaves the referral chain do they use their “second choice.” 

A referral from a primary care physician to an orthopedic doctor is a single choice. If the orthopedic doctor refers to a pain management physician, again, it is a single choice. The injured worker has now seen three doctors (Primary Care, Orthopedic, Pain Management), but is still within the same “choice.”  Doctors within the same practice count as a single choice. 

Injured workers need to be aware of their options. Insurance companies may designate a referral to an Orthopedic doctor as the “second opinion” and therefore, the second choice, when really this is still only a single choice. This crucial distinction affords the injured worker the opportunity to receive quality care. 

What happens in an emergency? The employer may arrange for emergency treatment after which the injured worker can choose their own doctor without using a choice. This common-sense provision allows employers to direct emergency care without sacrificing the worker’s choice of quality care in the future. 

The best advice for injured workers is to always obtain a referral from a treating doctor to any other doctor or specialist.  In Wisconsin, the injured worker – not the employer or the worker’s compensation insurance company – controls treatment.

Recovering From Injury – “Is Heroism the Standard?” Redux

Judge David B. Torrey

My friend and colleague, Professor and Judge David Torrey, with whom I serve on the Board of the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, recently posted this blog in response to an insurance industry speaker’s exhortation that injured workers should “ get off their asses” and get better. Here’s his moving response:

Many in the workers’ compensation community complain that seriously injured workers can develop a disability lifestyle, become dependent on drugs, and unreasonably extend their disabilities. Instead of falling into such a lifestyle, these critics argue, disabled workers should show “resilience.” This rhetoric, which I have written about before on this blog, has its genesis in progressive medical/rehabilitation thinking, Muscular Christianity (I think), and, realistically, employer/insurer cost considerations.

The complaint is legitimate, and one with which I have some sympathy. I also believe that some legitimately injured workers do indeed unreasonably extend their disabilities — if only waiting for a generous lump sum settlement. Many readers will know of the sharp critique of this type advanced by Dr. Nortin Hadler in his many books.

On the other hand, the “duty-of-resilience” critique can go too far, and is often articulated in overly simplistic terms. At my agency’s conference in Hershey, Pennsylvania (June 7-8), an articulate industry speaker, addressing an audience about medical marijuana, posited forcefully that the “choice between opioids and medical marijuana [for chronic pain patients] is a false choice….” What workers need to do, instead, is show some resilience and “get off their asses!” After all, a friend of his, who is partially paraplegic, has shown resilience and will often go hiking with him. If she can do it, so can others!

I believe the speaker knew his audience and thus took some pleasure in feeding these lions of the community some red meat, and indeed they rewarded this coarse declaration with a leonine roar of applause.

Yet, his panel partner, Dr. Michael Wolk, thereupon gently reminded the industry speaker — and the audience — that not all people respond to pain and other impairments the same way; indeed, he posited that science has shown that one’s genetic make-up can affect the ability to be resilient.

Dr. Wolk (my God, an astonishing speaker) might also have remarked, as have other physicians at our Pennsylvania conferences, that heroism is not appropriately considered the recovery standard in the first place. Commentators like the industry speaker, talking about resilience, often invoke exceptional individuals, like Christopher Reeve, but most of us realize that not everyone is Superman.

This point was vividly made two years ago in the memoir, A Body Undone: Living on After Great Pain (NYU Press 2016). The author, Christina Crosby, a professor at Wesleyan University, was rendered quadriplegic in a cycling accident, and has been left with chronic pain as well. She recounts in her memoir what life is like with such a catastrophic injury, shows that she indeed has great resilience — but leaves the heroism narrative behind. She makes clear that her circumstances, like education; a life of reflection and discipline; and the unflagging love and support of her family, make her ability to bounce back possible. Most of us know that not every injury victim will have these advantages. (My complete review of Professor Crosby’s book is posted at the research website www.davetorrey.info.)

Is all this not common sense? We have known for a century, after all, that young men respond differently to their traumatic wartime exposures. Some show a grim resilience; some are troubled for life, but are able to continue on; some are broken. In the modern day, most of us would not address such veterans with the admonition that they get off their asses. Injured workers deserve the same respect.

 

Trump Policies Bad for Workers’ Compensation

Dr. Richard Victor

Dr. Richard Victor, an economist who founded the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) 35 years ago, just presented a paper at the WCRI National Conference in Boston.  He indicated that federal policies on immigration and health insurance promise to make worse the challenges the United States faces by an aging workforce and a widespread labor shortage. He noted that workers’ compensation claims could double and overall costs could expand by over 300% in the next dozen years, without any increase in benefits to workers.  External forces could bring far more cases into the system because of a number of forces, including an aging workforce, labor shortage, slowdown in immigration, and more shifting to workers’ compensation claims that should be paid by group health insurance. Dr. Victor projected current claims out a dozen years to 2030 indicating that claims should actually be down to about ¾ of today’s numbers, but external factors will more than overtake that favorable percentage. Labor shortages caused by baby boomers retiring will increase injury rates.  Research indicates that the older workforce will mean an increase in lost work days and more injuries and a real impact on labor shortage as more baby boomers retire. Dr. Victor indicated “These labor shortages, which will be longer and deeper than anything we have experienced, will lead to significant increase in workers’ compensation claims and longer durations of disability.” During a period of labor shortages, employers relax hiring standards and hire workers they would not have hired in a normal labor market, including workers who are less capable. The overall labor shortfall leads to more workers’ compensation claims.

The Immigration Factor:

Economists have seen immigration as a factor that mitigates against the impact of the labor shortage. The Trump Administration, changing federal immigration policy, will further tighten labor markets and prolong the duration of a labor shortage. Moreover, Trump’s “anti-immigration rhetoric” also discourages people to come to America.  In health care, Victor noted that one in six health care workers is foreign-born including 27% of physicians and surgeons, 15% of nurses, and 22% of home health aide, each of which effects the workers’ compensation system.

Health Insurance

A shortage of people with adequate health insurance is also a problem for workers’ compensation. Health insurance deductibles have risen from the hundreds to many thousands of dollars, and this new reality causes more workers to go without or delay getting medical care for an injury or illness. When they can no longer ignore their condition, many claim it as a work-related condition and seek workers’ compensation (he cited a Rand Research study indicating workers with high deductible or co-insurance plan postponed care in over one-third of cases of the most common kind of workers’ compensation claims – soft tissue injuries.” As the number of workers who lose their insurance grows (since the Trump Administration and Congress ended subsidies and other aspects of the Affordable Care Act) case shifting form health insurance to workers’ compensation could have a major effect, ballooning workers’ compensation claims by as much as 35% in the next dozen years.

Victor’s conclusion: “You end up with a 300% increase in workers’ compensation costs without increasing benefits to injured workers.”

 

Center for Progressive Reform Launches National Database of Crimes Against Workers

Today’s post comes from guest author Paul J. McAndrew, Jr., from Paul McAndrew Law Firm.

Every year are a few work-fatalities that garner criminal prosecution and conviction. This is out the thousands of work-fatalities that occur every year. Until now, there’s been no one keeping a record of these fatality-causing events.

Now, the Center for Progressive Reform’s (CPR) Katie Tracy has reviewed court records, investigation files, and news stories to identify them many of them. After assembling information on more than 75 criminal cases from 17 states, she knew it was time to share all of it.

The result is CPR’s user friendly and publicly-available at Crimes Against Workers Database. I encourage you to explore this valuable tool. We believe that the awareness caused by sharing this information nationally can be a catalyst for legislators and others to understand the scope and scale of these crimes.

Employee Workers’ Compensation Fraud? No – Employer Fraud Rampant.

Attorney Leonard Jernigan compiled a list of the biggest workers’ compensation frauds

My friend and colleague Len Jernigan has again compiled the Top 10 Workers’ Compensation Fraud Cases for 2017.

 His results emphasize a theme that has been present for the last dozen years during which he has been compiling a “Top 10” list.  This year the Top 10 non-employee fraud cases resulted in fraud totaling just under $700 million.  Employee fraud cases resulted in zero fraud.  Seven of the Top 10 cases were from California, two from Texas, and one from Tennessee.

The cases involve health care fraud, where doctors prescribed inappropriate medications to pharmacies they operated, overbilling schemes for durable medical equipment, mail fraud, kickback schemes, referral of patients for unnecessary care, and prescribing unnecessary treatment.

A recurring theme, falsifying documents and under-reporting payroll to workers’ compensation insurance companies also appeared in the Top 10.  In one notorious case, the owners of a hotel hid the existence of 800 housekeeping and janitorial workers to avoid paying workers’ compensation insurance rates and payroll taxes.  The list also contains references to dishonest employers misclassifying more and more workers as independent contractors.  This misclassification is a fraud that wrongfully denies these employees workers’ compensation when injured, denies the government millions of dollars in payroll taxes to support Medicare, Social Security, Unemployment Compensation, and the fundamental rights of the workers.  Simply put, this misclassification is another employers shift the cost of accident and injury to the taxpayers and the fraud continues.

Small Businesses Don’t Have Workers’ Compensation Insurance

In a new study by Insureon, less than 1 in 5 small businesses carry workers’ compensation.  Although all State regulations require that small businesses have workers’ compensation, this study indicates that workers’ compensation is the least purchased insurance by small businesses.  (In Wisconsin, employers must have workers’ compensation if they hire only one employee paying more than $500 in a quarter or hire any three employees at any one time.)  The President of Insureon Jeff Somers said in an interview with workerscompensation.com that “small businesses often fail to carry workers’ compensation because they truly do not understand their insurance need; there is a major lack of awareness and education which insurers and brokers can alleviate.  One reason for this protection gap is a misplaced anxiety around how much workers’ compensation coverage actually costs, but when you compare the small price. . . the protection workers’ compensation provides makes an investment worth it.”

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, almost 3 million workplace injuries were reported by private industry employers in 2016, with nearly one-third resulting in time away from work.  The Insureon statistics showed that one in three businesses reported an incident that could have been covered by a workers’ compensation insurance policy and that one-fifth of all small businesses that filed for bankruptcy in 2016 did so because of lawsuits.  Workers’ compensation protects an employer from a lawsuit.  (In Wisconsin a worker injured by an uninsured employer has access to the Uninsured Employers Fund.  After the Fund pays workers’ compensation benefits, the Fund then pursues reimbursement from the employer.)

The Three Stooges Get Workers’ Comp: Why Backs Trump Knees and Shoulders in Wisconsin

Wisconsin’s unique workers’ compensation system contains one significant distinction, between “limb” injuries and “spine” injuries. Limb injuries (shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips, knees) are not worth as much to the injured worker as a spine injury.

To illustrate this problem to my law students, I use the 3 Stooges example: Moe, Larry and Curly work for a tree service earning $15 per hour or $600 per week. A tree branch falls on all three of them, injuring Moe’s shoulder, Larry’s knee, and Curly’s neck. They are all off work for 10 weeks while they are healing from surgeries required by the injury. During that time they received Temporary Total Disability at two-thirds of their wage or $400 per week, a total of $4,000 for each of them. After they are done healing, all three of their doctors assign a 10% functional disability rating for their injury and a 10- pound lifting restriction, which their employer cannot accommodate.

Moe gets 10% of 500 weeks for his shoulder payable at $362 per week, or a whopping total of $18,100 – making his total workers’ comp recovery just over $20,000.

Larry gets 10% of a knee or 42.5 weeks at $362 per week, or $15,385 – making his total recovery just under $20,000.

Curly, who had a neck injury and surgery, gets 10% of 1000 weeks at $362 per week, or $36,200. However, since he cannot return to the tree company, he also gets a recovery for his Loss of Earning Capacity. Based on his 10- pound restriction and his very limited education, he is probably limited to a minimum wage or part time job which would result in a 50% Loss of Earning Capacity, payable for 500 weeks or a total of $181,000. If his disability is serious enough, he may in fact receive his $400 per week for the rest of his life, bringing his total to well over a half million dollars.

That’s why many workers’ compensation attorneys (and insurance companies) focus their attention on spine injuries.

Trump’s Assault on Workers

As a workers’ compensation attorney, I tend to view current events through the prism of their effect on workers and more specifically injured workers.  The Trump Administration has rolled back his predecessor’s strides in environment, labor and finance, civil rights, health care, government reform, immigration, and education.  I would like to specifically address reverses in worker and consumer safety.  The Washington Post updated how Trump is rolling back Obama’s legacy through 16 executive actions, 74 cabinet level agency decisions, 14 congressional review acts, and a piece of new legislation. 

  • Specifically, in terms of worker and consumer safety, the Mine Safety and Health Administration is revising a mining inspection rule published three days after Obama left office by allowing examiners to do their reviews while miners are working letting companies not record hazardous conditions if they are immediately corrected.
  • The Trump Administration Interior Department ordered the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine to stop a study of health risks for residents near surface mining operations in the Appalachians.
  • The EPA delayed implementing a rule that would have changed how agricultural workers are protected from pesticides.
  • The EPA is delaying implementation of rule to require manufacturers to label formaldehyde and composite wood products.
  • A Coast Guard plan to regulate firefighting systems on tanker ships and helipads on offshore platforms was withdrawn.
  • Additionally, a Coast Guard rule that would have required all ships and berths to maintain equipment and technical systems for safety was withdrawn.
  • OSHA delayed implementing a rule regulating construction worker exposure to silica (linked to lung disease and cancer).
  • The House and Senate passed a bill signed by President Trump eliminating worker safety regulations aiming to track and reduce workplace injuries and death.
  • The Labor Department removed from its agenda a proposal to stiffen exposure standards for chemical solvents.
  • The Labor Department cancelled plans to lower permissible exposure limits for some substances that had been set in 1971 and cancelled plans to revoke obsolete permissible exposure limits for other substances.
  • The Labor Department removed from its agenda a proposal to tighten exposure standards for styrene, a chemical used in plastics identified as a carcinogen.

This laundry list of anti-worker executive actions, Cabinet-level agency decisions and Congressional review acts reveals the hypocrisy of Trump’s campaign promises to help working families.  Rather, it reveals his completely anti-worker policy.