Category Archives: workers comp qanda

What Should I Have Ready For My First Meeting With My Lawyer?

We provide a questionnaire for you to fill out before our first meeting

Today’s post comes from guest author Nathan Reckman from Paul McAndrew Law Firm.

Most injured workers seeking an attorney’s help on their workers’ compensation claim have never hired an attorney before. This post gives a brief overview of how you can prepare for your first meeting with your attorney after you have been hurt at work.

The most important part of that first meeting takes place before you ever set foot in the attorney’s office. For your attorney, the goal of the first meeting is to gain an accurate understanding of the facts surrounding your injury. This is so the attorney can assess how the law will be applied to your case. In order for the attorney to make an accurate assessment, you have to be prepared to Continue reading

Who Can Provide Worker’s Comp Medical Treatment?

Medical treatment expense now eclipses indemnity benefits paid in Wisconsin for worker’s compensation. The employer must supply medical treatment reasonably required to cure and relieve from the effects of the injury.

Treatment can be medical, surgical, chiropractic, psychological, pediatric, or dental and includes hospital treatment, medical and surgical supplies, crutches, and artificial members and appliances.

…Wisconsin employees have their choice of treating practitioners…

Unlike some states where the employees must obtain treatment from a panel of physicians, Wisconsin employees have their choice of treating practitioners (except in genuine “emergency” situations where the employer can choose). Ohio, for example, just announced it has expanded the list of providers who can treat injured workers and strengthen certification requirements for those providers.

Ohio’s Bureau of Worker’s Compensation expanded health care professionals to include adult day care facilities, anesthesiology assistants, independent diagnostic testing facilities, and sleep laboratories.

While in Wisconsin, the employee has a great deal of freedom of choice in selecting a treating practitioner, some limits apply. Practitioners must be licensed to practice in Wisconsin. Out-of-State treatment is compensable if Continue reading